First Fall MFA Student Reading

Each semester, the Creative Writing Program hosts a student reading series. In the fall series, 2nd year MFA students read from some of their latest work, which for many includes bits and pieces of what will become their theses in the spring.

The first reading of the fall semester went down at Night Heron Books on September 21st. Emily Pifer, Ammon Medina, and Alec Osthoff read to a full house on a Friday night that delivered Laramie’s first snow of the season!

Emily, 2nd year in nonfiction, read from her thesis-in-progress, Body of Work.


2nd year Poet Ammon read from an essay that features the re-appropriated poems of Pablo Neruda.


And Alec, 2nd year fiction, read from his novel-in-progress, Sawtooths.  He also read his poem, “Western Interior,” that inspired him to write the novel.


Huge shout-out to Lilly Schneider for her lovely locks in the foreground of most of the pictures taken at the event!


MFA Alumni Reading: Katie Schmid & Brock Jones

On Thursday, September 22nd, two University of Wyoming Creative Writing alumni poets, Katie Schmid and Brock Jones, visited campus for a lunch with current MFA students and a public reading at Night Heron Books and Coffeehouse. Both poets read to a full house, with audience members sitting on the floor next to shelves of used books, and even a few folks listening from the stairwell.


Brock read from his acclaimed chapbook, Cenotaph, a series of poems that are part memory, part inquiry into the aftermath of war.The chapbook won the Miller Williams Poetry Prize, selected by poet Billy Collins.


Katie read from sections of her chapbook, Forget Me/Hit Me/Let Me Drink Great Quantities of Clear, Evil Liquor, which won Split Lip Press‘s Chapbook Prize.


She stunned us with sections that explore the intensity of childhood, missing fathers, and masculinity. A review of her chapbook can be found at The Rumpus.



Current MFA students were impressed and heartened by the successes Katie and Brock have experienced since their tenure in the program.

Wyoming Democratic Caucus

One of the downsides of living and voting in Wyoming is that the state doesn’t have much pull in presidential elections and what pull it does have always goes to the GOP. (Not passing political judgment here, just saying that the outcome is more or less guaranteed.) The silver lining is that for smaller-scale politics, our individual votes count for a lot more. This includes party primaries. A few left-leaning members of our cohort gathered at the Laramie Ice Recreation Center on Saturday for the Democratic Caucus. Leading up to the part of the caucus where citizens spoke on behalf of the candidates, the atmosphere was decidedly festive.

In the end, Albany County (where Laramie is located; for some insane reason, it’s not located in Laramie County) sided with Bernie Sanders, with Sanders getting 75% of the vote. Below, you can see Sanders supporters on the right and Clinton supporters on the left.


Writers of Color & the UW Creative Writing Program

Over the past several months, several conversations have taken place here at the University of Wyoming regarding the way that the Creative Writing program supports (or fails to support) its people of color and other marginalized minorities. Some of these conversations have been difficult and have forced us to confront the realities of life in Laramie and at UW. Kristine Sloane, who contributes to the blog “The MFA Years,” recently published a post titled “Challenging the Whiteness of MFA Programs: A Year in Confrontations at UW.” It’s an important story to tell, not only for those of us here in Wyoming but for those in MFA programs across the country.

Student Publications!


We’ve had some exciting student publications and awards recently. Check them out here:

Liz Kulze won the Tennessee Williams Fiction Contest for her short story, “Widow.”

In the last few months, Jess White has published several great essays in Feministing.

Randall Tyrone is featured in the second issue of Oversound. He also published three poems in (and was interviewed for) Electric Literature‘s Okey-Panky.

Khalym Kari Burke-Thomas’ THUGBAIT was a finalist in the New Delta Review’s annual chapbook contest.

Trey Williams’ short story “Darling, Keith, the Subway Girl, and Jumping Joe Henry” was published in the Winter 2016 issue of Glimmer Train. His story “Twelve in the Black” was a finalist for storySouth’s Million Writers Award.

Bethann Merkle published an article, “Drawn to Caribou,” in American Scientist.

Congratulations to all these fine writers!